‘Supper’ by GCU’s Silvana Cardell moves, motivates, inspires

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‘Jumping barriers’

The current battles in politics over the status of illegal immigrants also shaped Supper, People on the Move.

“This is a work that everyone can relate to on some level. I want people to walk away realizing that there is so much more to the immigrant experience than they realize. — Silvana Cardell”

“This whole thing that’s happening now kind of changed my work. The work started out being about me and my experience of dislocation, and then I realized it was the whole world. I was just one of so many,” she says. “I wasn’t risking my life crossing a border. I had my papers. I had never worked in an illegal situation.

“But then I started exploring the idea of why people would risk their lives to move to another place, thinking their lives would be better.”

Supper‘s movement vocabulary reflects a theme of overcoming barriers as well as the turbulence of her emotions during the time she was waiting to become a citizen.

“I have created a kinetic experience. We work a lot with tables. The tables become like a banquet table. We place them in different ways in the space. They become a barrier where half of the audience cannot see what’s going on, on the other side,” she says. “The tables become places where people climb and jump, while carrying their belongings. They become a door that opens and closes shut.

“The movement itself is very physical—a lot of jumping barriers.”

| Next story: ARTISTS REFLECT ON ‘SUPPER’ |

Like others Ms. Cardell has created, Supper is more than just a dance piece. Audience members, for example, will be documented when entering the performance space, as if they, too, were immigrants. Performances conclude with an invitation to eat and share personal stories about immigration.

Ms. Cardell has collaborated with musician Nick Zammutto and visual artist Jennifer Baker to create an experience that goes beyond movement. Mr. Zammutto, for example, created a special soundscape that not only complements and is inspired by Ms. Cardell’s movement, but also works with an intense echo effect that exists in the performing space.

Ms. Baker, in addition to her more traditional duties of coordinating costumes and set pieces, has been conducting interviews with immigrants that are being used for a series of panels that audience members will see when they enter the performing space. The interviews and accompanying photos can also be seen on the project’s Web site and companion blog.

“This is a work that everyone can relate to on some level,” says Ms. Cardell. “I want people to walk away realizing that there is so much more to the immigrant experience than they realize.”


MORE FROM GEORGIAN COURT UNIVERSITY
» DISCOVER THE GCU B.A. IN DANCE
» REGISTER FOR THE GCU 2015 SUMMER DANCE INTENSIVE

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Photos by Jennifer Baker/Supperdance.com. Ms. Baker, a painter and sculptor, is the curator of Portraits of People on the Move, and manages set and costume design for the performance.

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Story by Karyn D. Collins, for Georgian Court University. Ms. Collins, a veteran journalist, is the editor of The Black Dance and Broadway Blog, and serves as an adjunct professor at several New Jersey colleges and universities.

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‘Jumping barriers’

The current battles in politics over the status of illegal immigrants also shaped Supper, People on the Move.

“This is a work that everyone can relate to on some level. I want people to walk away realizing that there is so much more to the immigrant experience than they realize. — Silvana Cardell”

“This whole thing that’s happening now kind of changed my work. The work started out being about me and my experience of dislocation, and then I realized it was the whole world. I was just one of so many,” she says. “I wasn’t risking my life crossing a border. I had my papers. I had never worked in an illegal situation.

“But then I started exploring the idea of why people would risk their lives to move to another place, thinking their lives would be better.”

Supper‘s movement vocabulary reflects a theme of overcoming barriers as well as the turbulence of her emotions during the time she was waiting to become a citizen.

“I have created a kinetic experience. We work a lot with tables. The tables become like a banquet table. We place them in different ways in the space. They become a barrier where half of the audience cannot see what’s going on, on the other side,” she says. “The tables become places where people climb and jump, while carrying their belongings. They become a door that opens and closes shut.

“The movement itself is very physical—a lot of jumping barriers.”

| Next story: ARTISTS REFLECT ON ‘SUPPER’ |

Like others Ms. Cardell has created, Supper is more than just a dance piece. Audience members, for example, will be documented when entering the performance space, as if they, too, were immigrants. Performances conclude with an invitation to eat and share personal stories about immigration.

Ms. Cardell has collaborated with musician Nick Zammutto and visual artist Jennifer Baker to create an experience that goes beyond movement. Mr. Zammutto, for example, created a special soundscape that not only complements and is inspired by Ms. Cardell’s movement, but also works with an intense echo effect that exists in the performing space.

Ms. Baker, in addition to her more traditional duties of coordinating costumes and set pieces, has been conducting interviews with immigrants that are being used for a series of panels that audience members will see when they enter the performing space. The interviews and accompanying photos can also be seen on the project’s Web site and companion blog.

“This is a work that everyone can relate to on some level,” says Ms. Cardell. “I want people to walk away realizing that there is so much more to the immigrant experience than they realize.”


MORE FROM GEORGIAN COURT UNIVERSITY
» DISCOVER THE GCU B.A. IN DANCE
» REGISTER FOR THE GCU 2015 SUMMER DANCE INTENSIVE

[google_font font=”Source Sans Pro” font_size=”14″ font_weight=”400″]

Photos by Jennifer Baker/Supperdance.com. Ms. Baker, a painter and sculptor, is the curator of Portraits of People on the Move, and manages set and costume design for the performance.

[/google_font]

[google_font font=”Source Sans Pro” font_size=”14″ font_weight=”400″]

Story by Karyn D. Collins, for Georgian Court University. Ms. Collins, a veteran journalist, is the editor of The Black Dance and Broadway Blog, and serves as an adjunct professor at several New Jersey colleges and universities.

[/google_font]

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