‘Supper’ by GCU’s Silvana Cardell moves, motivates, inspires

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Supper for All: Dance Director’s ‘Supper, People on the Move’ Explores Immigration Stories

 

IN SOME WAYS, SILVANA CARDELL’S story of her immigration experience would seem to be much simpler than that of some immigrants. Ms. Cardell’s journey to American citizenship wasn’t the type of odyssey one hears so much about these days of fleeing political or religious persecution. Ms. Cardell, who heads Georgian Court University’s dance program, came to this country to pursue opportunities as an artist. She’s been an American citizen since 2013.

But her experiences while pursuing her citizenship led her to create a world premiere work that was inspired by that emotional journey. Called Supper, People on the Move, Ms. Cardell’s creation is a multidisciplinary project scheduled for June 25–28, 2015, at the Icebox Project Space at Crane Arts in Philadelphia. [Order tickets here.]


A free screening of the piece will be shown outdoors on the Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Friday, June 26 from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on the Mall between Chestnut and Market Streets and 5th and 6th Streets.


 

Video courtesy of YouTube/Silvana Cardell

Rooted in reality

Supper, People on the Move received major funding support from the prestigious Pew Center for Arts & Heritage in Philadelphia, as well as the Swarthmore College Project. Ms. Cardell also received a summer research grant for the project from Georgian Court University.

Ms. Cardell first came to this country from her native Argentina in 1986, to study dance at Temple University. After earning her bachelor’s degree and returning home, she decided to return to the U.S. in 2002, this time for good.

Though relatively simple in many ways, Ms. Cardell says the experience of returning to this country and subsequently going through the process of seeking American citizenship was still filled with plenty of tension and anxious moments.

“My experience was a very emotional thing. It was not so much about me needing to escape or something like that. It was a decision made for a mixture of professional development and adventure,” she explains of her push to return to the United States after initially studying here to earn her bachelor’s degree at Temple University in Philadelphia.


MORE FROM GEORGIAN COURT UNIVERSITY
» DISCOVER THE GCU B.A. IN DANCE
» REGISTER FOR THE GCU 2015 SUMMER DANCE INTENSIVE

Creativity…from tension

“When I decided to come back to get my master’s degree, it was more complicated. I had a family and children,” Ms. Cardell says. “There was this moment when I got stuck in between. It was complicated. I felt like I was being pulled apart. And all of these other factors created this tension.

“I started to feel like that tension was showing in my work, too, and I wanted to explore that discomfort.”

That underlying tension inspired Ms. Cardell to reflect in the way she feels most comfortable—through her art. She says that the work’s title and overall theme were also inspired by the Last Supper, the final meal Jesus had with his disciples according to the four Gospels of the Christian Bible.

“It’s a moment when you’re going to go from one place to another. The Last Supper. It’s a transformational moment,” says Ms. Cardell. “From that idea, I started working on my own idea of dislocation, moving away from what you know and moving to something unknown.”

 | Keep reading: Jumping Barriers |

» RELATED
Explore the project at supperdance.com
Reserve tickets for the June 25-28 performances
Read immigrant stories,
 curated by Supper, People on the Move

 

Supper for All: Dance Director’s ‘Supper, People on the Move’ Explores Immigration Stories

 

IN SOME WAYS, SILVANA CARDELL’S story of her immigration experience would seem to be much simpler than that of some immigrants. Ms. Cardell’s journey to American citizenship wasn’t the type of odyssey one hears so much about these days of fleeing political or religious persecution. Ms. Cardell, who heads Georgian Court University’s dance program, came to this country to pursue opportunities as an artist. She’s been an American citizen since 2013.

But her experiences while pursuing her citizenship led her to create a world premiere work that was inspired by that emotional journey. Called Supper, People on the Move, Ms. Cardell’s creation is a multidisciplinary project scheduled for June 25–28, 2015, at the Icebox Project Space at Crane Arts in Philadelphia. [Order tickets here.]


A free screening of the piece will be shown outdoors on the Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Friday, June 26 from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on the Mall between Chestnut and Market Streets and 5th and 6th Streets.


 

Video courtesy of YouTube/Silvana Cardell

Rooted in reality

Supper, People on the Move received major funding support from the prestigious Pew Center for Arts & Heritage in Philadelphia, as well as the Swarthmore College Project. Ms. Cardell also received a summer research grant for the project from Georgian Court University.

Ms. Cardell first came to this country from her native Argentina in 1986, to study dance at Temple University. After earning her bachelor’s degree and returning home, she decided to return to the U.S. in 2002, this time for good.

Though relatively simple in many ways, Ms. Cardell says the experience of returning to this country and subsequently going through the process of seeking American citizenship was still filled with plenty of tension and anxious moments.

“My experience was a very emotional thing. It was not so much about me needing to escape or something like that. It was a decision made for a mixture of professional development and adventure,” she explains of her push to return to the United States after initially studying here to earn her bachelor’s degree at Temple University in Philadelphia.


MORE FROM GEORGIAN COURT UNIVERSITY
» DISCOVER THE GCU B.A. IN DANCE
» REGISTER FOR THE GCU 2015 SUMMER DANCE INTENSIVE

Creativity…from tension

“When I decided to come back to get my master’s degree, it was more complicated. I had a family and children,” Ms. Cardell says. “There was this moment when I got stuck in between. It was complicated. I felt like I was being pulled apart. And all of these other factors created this tension.

“I started to feel like that tension was showing in my work, too, and I wanted to explore that discomfort.”

That underlying tension inspired Ms. Cardell to reflect in the way she feels most comfortable—through her art. She says that the work’s title and overall theme were also inspired by the Last Supper, the final meal Jesus had with his disciples according to the four Gospels of the Christian Bible.

“It’s a moment when you’re going to go from one place to another. The Last Supper. It’s a transformational moment,” says Ms. Cardell. “From that idea, I started working on my own idea of dislocation, moving away from what you know and moving to something unknown.”

 | Keep reading: Jumping Barriers |

» RELATED
Explore the project at supperdance.com
Reserve tickets for the June 25-28 performances
Read immigrant stories,
 curated by Supper, People on the Move

 

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