Rolling out the welcome mat for men—at GCU

After educating women in the Catholic Mercy tradition for more than 100 years, Georgian Court University became a fully coeducational institution this fall, welcoming the largest freshman class in its 105-year history. GCU’s freshman class for the 2013-2014 year includes 275 students, nearly a 9 percent increase over the previous record of 253 students in 2009. The university welcomed 75 male freshman students, making the incoming class 27.3 percent male.

The university announced its decision to transition to full coeducation in May 2012. Previously, men were only able to attend undergraduate and graduate programs in the evening. Residence halls and athletics were only open to women. As of Fall 2012, men were welcomed to register for undergraduate programs in the day, and in August 2013, the first men moved into two of the three residence halls on campus. This fall also saw the launch of the first-ever GCU men’s athletic teams-in soccer, basketball, cross-country, and indoor and outdoor track & field-as well as full participation in student activities by male students.

“After 105 years, we are expanding our mission,” says Rosemary E. Jeffries, RSM, Ph.D., university president. “GCU’s special concern for women will remain a central part of our philosophy, but we are excited about the opportunity to offer a Mercy values-based education to a wider audience of students.”

The university is poised, with 30 majors and a wide variety of activities, to address the needs and interests of both male and female students. Additions to GCU’s athletic offerings are planned for the coming years.

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After educating women in the Catholic Mercy tradition for more than 100 years, Georgian Court University became a fully coeducational institution this fall, welcoming the largest freshman class in its 105-year history. GCU’s freshman class for the 2013-2014 year includes 275 students, nearly a 9 percent increase over the previous record of 253 students in 2009. The university welcomed 75 male freshman students, making the incoming class 27.3 percent male.

The university announced its decision to transition to full coeducation in May 2012. Previously, men were only able to attend undergraduate and graduate programs in the evening. Residence halls and athletics were only open to women. As of Fall 2012, men were welcomed to register for undergraduate programs in the day, and in August 2013, the first men moved into two of the three residence halls on campus. This fall also saw the launch of the first-ever GCU men’s athletic teams-in soccer, basketball, cross-country, and indoor and outdoor track & field-as well as full participation in student activities by male students.

“After 105 years, we are expanding our mission,” says Rosemary E. Jeffries, RSM, Ph.D., university president. “GCU’s special concern for women will remain a central part of our philosophy, but we are excited about the opportunity to offer a Mercy values-based education to a wider audience of students.”

The university is poised, with 30 majors and a wide variety of activities, to address the needs and interests of both male and female students. Additions to GCU’s athletic offerings are planned for the coming years.

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