Mind Matters

IMG_4583.JPG

Graduate students in Georgian Court University’s Learning Disabilities Teacher-Consultant program recently presented at the 21st Century Literacy Conference. The event, hosted by the New Jersey Council for Exceptional Children and jointly sponsored with The Madison Institute,  New Jersey Principals and Supervisors, and the Foundation for Educational Administration, was held Feb. 5 in Monroe, NJ.

 

AT GCU, WORKING TEACHERS ARE LEARNING TEACHERS. Graduate students Theresa Price (Little Egg Harbor), Kristy Prybylski (Bridgewater-Raritan), Elizabeth House (Ocean), Anna Maria Marinos (Hamilton), and Cathryn Browning (Springfield Township) shared their research in poster format regarding the psychological and neurophysiological basis of learning.

“To describe our students sometimes seems an ineffable attempt to communicate their willingness to risk, their earnest interest in contributing to our society, and their sincere and intense efforts to help the students they teach,” said Dr. Mary Ann Smorra. “Sometimes, one must see them in action. It is not enough to simply talk about their attributes.

Their presentations grew out of a class assignment for Dr. Smorra’s course, The Psychological and Neurophysiological Basis of Learning. Their research covered challenging topics, such as school refusal and interventions for parents and educators; anxiety disorders; dyslexia; tactile hypersensitivity in the autistic child; and dyslexia and multi-sensory instruction. The conference also included posters by GCU students Michele LeBlanc, a special education teacher in Island Heights who researched dysgraphia/poor handwriting, and Kimberly Pastine, a special education teacher in Springfield, whose focus is on dyscalculia or difficulties in mathematics.

“It was wonderful to see our students recognize the professional importance and meaningfulness of a conference such as the one we attended,” said Dr. Smorra, who also presented her findings on neuroplasticity and what happens in the brain when we read. Her research, which also covers “visual processing, phoneme recognition, and word interpretation aspects of the reading process,” was presented in 2014 at the University of Minho, Portugal.

 

IMG_4583.JPG

Graduate students in Georgian Court University’s Learning Disabilities Teacher-Consultant program recently presented at the 21st Century Literacy Conference. The event, hosted by the New Jersey Council for Exceptional Children and jointly sponsored with The Madison Institute,  New Jersey Principals and Supervisors, and the Foundation for Educational Administration, was held Feb. 5 in Monroe, NJ.

 

AT GCU, WORKING TEACHERS ARE LEARNING TEACHERS. Graduate students Theresa Price (Little Egg Harbor), Kristy Prybylski (Bridgewater-Raritan), Elizabeth House (Ocean), Anna Maria Marinos (Hamilton), and Cathryn Browning (Springfield Township) shared their research in poster format regarding the psychological and neurophysiological basis of learning.

“To describe our students sometimes seems an ineffable attempt to communicate their willingness to risk, their earnest interest in contributing to our society, and their sincere and intense efforts to help the students they teach,” said Dr. Mary Ann Smorra. “Sometimes, one must see them in action. It is not enough to simply talk about their attributes.

Their presentations grew out of a class assignment for Dr. Smorra’s course, The Psychological and Neurophysiological Basis of Learning. Their research covered challenging topics, such as school refusal and interventions for parents and educators; anxiety disorders; dyslexia; tactile hypersensitivity in the autistic child; and dyslexia and multi-sensory instruction. The conference also included posters by GCU students Michele LeBlanc, a special education teacher in Island Heights who researched dysgraphia/poor handwriting, and Kimberly Pastine, a special education teacher in Springfield, whose focus is on dyscalculia or difficulties in mathematics.

“It was wonderful to see our students recognize the professional importance and meaningfulness of a conference such as the one we attended,” said Dr. Smorra, who also presented her findings on neuroplasticity and what happens in the brain when we read. Her research, which also covers “visual processing, phoneme recognition, and word interpretation aspects of the reading process,” was presented in 2014 at the University of Minho, Portugal.

 

Related posts