‘Mercy in Real Life’ with Kerry Weber—at GCU

How are we meant to be Mercy every day? That was the question posed by Kerry Weber, a Mercy Associate and author of Mercy in the City, who spent the day at Georgian Court University on Nov. 18 to speak with the campus community and inspire us to integrate mercy works in our lives.

 

IMG_0531Weber is an alumna of the Mercy Volunteer Corps and managing editor of America magazine. Her book details the challenges and rewards she experienced during her commitment to spend 40 days practicing the seven corporal works of Mercy in a meaningful way.

She shared her experiences and insight in a thoughtful and motivating presentation before a crowd of more than 70 students, faculty, administration, and guests at the Little Theatre in the evening.

Weber called upon us to contemplate what it means to be mercy in our lives. “Mercy is the motivating force furthering justice and love,” she said. “It calls us and requires us to be better. Mercy is listening to one another with love.”

Citing Pope Francis, she noted his use of mercy as the verb, “mercying,” and his definition of mercy as a call to humanity and a call to give to others, a mission to see people first.

She echoed the Pope’s call to help people one a time. “With small actions, we see the bigger picture, the larger systemic problems.” In doing these works, she said, we must also examine our fears and strengths and ask ourselves, “How do we become better citizens of Mercy?”

Weber spoke of her experiences as a Mercy volunteer at a school on a Navajo reservation, her visits with prisoners in San Quentin State Prison, her volunteer work at soup kitchens, and her experience giving out sandwiches to the homeless at Penn Station in New York.

She noted that she made some mistakes along the way, underscoring her message that “we don’t have to be the best or perfect” to do mercy works or help others. She said it is important to remember that we are all “wonderfully flawed and beautiful,” adding, “Jesus did a lot of good things with imperfect people.”

It is important for us to incorporate the “mercy mindset” and “see Mercy at work in ourselves,” she said. “If we do works of mercy, we can be recipients of mercy.”

All of us can do Mercy works not only for strangers, but for our family and friends too. Despite our busy lives, she said, mercy service opportunities are “energizing” and in contrast, not doing works of mercy can drain us in a different way.

She encouraged us to seek out Mercy mentors as resources. “The more people involved in these works, the more we can do together,” she said. She also suggested to be creative with mercy works, such as hosting a canned food drive at a meeting.

“Corporal works of mercy asks us to see the world,” Weber said. “Works of mercy call us to become our authentic selves.”
She concluded with Pope Francis’ declaration that mercy is a word that changes the world.

Earlier in the day, Weber spoke during a special Student Leaders session and shared dinner with students in Campus Ministry and member of the Year of Hope Committee. The program, sponsored by the Office of Campus Ministry, was supported through a Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE)

Contributed by Michelle Giles, GCU Grants and Advancement Communications Specialist

How are we meant to be Mercy every day? That was the question posed by Kerry Weber, a Mercy Associate and author of Mercy in the City, who spent the day at Georgian Court University on Nov. 18 to speak with the campus community and inspire us to integrate mercy works in our lives.

 

IMG_0531Weber is an alumna of the Mercy Volunteer Corps and managing editor of America magazine. Her book details the challenges and rewards she experienced during her commitment to spend 40 days practicing the seven corporal works of Mercy in a meaningful way.

She shared her experiences and insight in a thoughtful and motivating presentation before a crowd of more than 70 students, faculty, administration, and guests at the Little Theatre in the evening.

Weber called upon us to contemplate what it means to be mercy in our lives. “Mercy is the motivating force furthering justice and love,” she said. “It calls us and requires us to be better. Mercy is listening to one another with love.”

Citing Pope Francis, she noted his use of mercy as the verb, “mercying,” and his definition of mercy as a call to humanity and a call to give to others, a mission to see people first.

She echoed the Pope’s call to help people one a time. “With small actions, we see the bigger picture, the larger systemic problems.” In doing these works, she said, we must also examine our fears and strengths and ask ourselves, “How do we become better citizens of Mercy?”

Weber spoke of her experiences as a Mercy volunteer at a school on a Navajo reservation, her visits with prisoners in San Quentin State Prison, her volunteer work at soup kitchens, and her experience giving out sandwiches to the homeless at Penn Station in New York.

She noted that she made some mistakes along the way, underscoring her message that “we don’t have to be the best or perfect” to do mercy works or help others. She said it is important to remember that we are all “wonderfully flawed and beautiful,” adding, “Jesus did a lot of good things with imperfect people.”

It is important for us to incorporate the “mercy mindset” and “see Mercy at work in ourselves,” she said. “If we do works of mercy, we can be recipients of mercy.”

All of us can do Mercy works not only for strangers, but for our family and friends too. Despite our busy lives, she said, mercy service opportunities are “energizing” and in contrast, not doing works of mercy can drain us in a different way.

She encouraged us to seek out Mercy mentors as resources. “The more people involved in these works, the more we can do together,” she said. She also suggested to be creative with mercy works, such as hosting a canned food drive at a meeting.

“Corporal works of mercy asks us to see the world,” Weber said. “Works of mercy call us to become our authentic selves.”
She concluded with Pope Francis’ declaration that mercy is a word that changes the world.

Earlier in the day, Weber spoke during a special Student Leaders session and shared dinner with students in Campus Ministry and member of the Year of Hope Committee. The program, sponsored by the Office of Campus Ministry, was supported through a Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE)

Contributed by Michelle Giles, GCU Grants and Advancement Communications Specialist

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