Georgian Court hosts “Poet of the Poor”

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Msgr. Michael Doyle illuminates Theta Alpha Kappa Honor Society induction ceremony

Msgr. Michael Doyle, renowned poet of the poor and social justice advocate, whose priestly ministry to the under served and impoverished residents of Camden has spanned more than five decades, lit up the Theta Alpha Kappa Honor Society induction ceremony April 28,with insights on crafting liturgies that build community and bridge the gap between despair and hope.


 

theology_flickrSee more photos from Theta Alpha Kappa

It was a night to remember for students, faculty and all of the faithful who gathered to hear Msgr. Doyle. View and download free photos from the event.

 

 

 


 

 

Msgr. Doyle’s wry humor, lilting Irish accent and gift for story telling complemented his compelling and eye-witness approach in a presentation entitled “Liturgy and Social Justice.” The topic was especially appreciated at an event where five graduate students – Carolyn Messina, Jeanne Sundberg and Matthew Abraham and Jeanne Sundberg, Camden Diocese; Rodrigo Colon and James McGuire, independent students – were recognized for their academic achievements in religion and theology. Not present were Lisa Aldridge, Trenton Diocese and Kathia Arango.

About Theta Alpha Kappa

Theta Alpha Kappa was established in 1976 at Manhattan College for the purpose of recognizing the academic achievements of religion and theology students. Since then, the society has grown to more than 200 chapters nationally, among them, Georgian Court, a sigma or founding member.

In a moving and highly personal reflection, Msgr. Doyle captured the essence of shepherding his flock of about 400 in Sacred Heart Church and School, located in one of Camden’s most troubled neighborhoods. He shared some of his experiences in recent years, including processing to church from an abandoned lot with palms, creating an all-hands link for the Our Father, and using the Stations of the Cross to honor slain individuals (one year, 38 people died within three blocks of Sacred Heart).

The poor need more than our help

The subject of critically acclaimed documentaries and many articles for his unceasing efforts to reclaim the city that was once a thriving hub of industry, Msgr. Doyle gave real examples of how liturgy can be balm in Gilead to those who struggle daily to subsist in neighborhoods marked by poverty, urban decay and drug abuse.

“Honor the poor,” Msgr. Doyle said. “Don’t just help them.”

Among the most moving illustrations, an Advent liturgy in which the entire congregation gathers to bless the women who are with child during the holy season of expectation, a special blessing of seeds for the garden on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception and liturgies that celebrate the role of grandparents in “passing the treasure of faith” on to new generations.

 


Learn more about Georgian Court University’s master’s degree or certificate program in theology, or the new online graduate certificate in Mercy Spirituality, now available to anyone—anywhere—who is interested in the Mercy spiritual tradition.


 

We should be ‘doing Mass’

During his introduction, Dr. Joseph Gower, professor and chair of GCU’s Department of Religious Studies and Theology, which sponsored the ceremony, noted that Msgr. Doyle doesn’t just preach the gospel, he lives it. He called Doyle an authentic witness to the Gospel.

Agreeing to that sentiment after the presentation was inductee Rod Colon who found Msgr. Doyle’s approach to the liturgy profoundly moving. He was especially taken by Msgr. Doyle’s gentle and “unique” focus on looking to the simple and ordinary for uplifting inspiration.

“His thoughts on Church as community, on ‘doing Mass, not just being at Mass’ and doing your bit to help a world that is so self-centered are messages that need to be heard,” Colon said. “We need to bring the secular and the spiritual closer together and he’s a good advocate for that.”

Contributed by freelance writer Lois Rogers

Msgr. Michael Doyle illuminates Theta Alpha Kappa Honor Society induction ceremony

Msgr. Michael Doyle, renowned poet of the poor and social justice advocate, whose priestly ministry to the under served and impoverished residents of Camden has spanned more than five decades, lit up the Theta Alpha Kappa Honor Society induction ceremony April 28,with insights on crafting liturgies that build community and bridge the gap between despair and hope.


 

theology_flickrSee more photos from Theta Alpha Kappa

It was a night to remember for students, faculty and all of the faithful who gathered to hear Msgr. Doyle. View and download free photos from the event.

 

 

 


 

 

Msgr. Doyle’s wry humor, lilting Irish accent and gift for story telling complemented his compelling and eye-witness approach in a presentation entitled “Liturgy and Social Justice.” The topic was especially appreciated at an event where five graduate students – Carolyn Messina, Jeanne Sundberg and Matthew Abraham and Jeanne Sundberg, Camden Diocese; Rodrigo Colon and James McGuire, independent students – were recognized for their academic achievements in religion and theology. Not present were Lisa Aldridge, Trenton Diocese and Kathia Arango.

About Theta Alpha Kappa

Theta Alpha Kappa was established in 1976 at Manhattan College for the purpose of recognizing the academic achievements of religion and theology students. Since then, the society has grown to more than 200 chapters nationally, among them, Georgian Court, a sigma or founding member.

In a moving and highly personal reflection, Msgr. Doyle captured the essence of shepherding his flock of about 400 in Sacred Heart Church and School, located in one of Camden’s most troubled neighborhoods. He shared some of his experiences in recent years, including processing to church from an abandoned lot with palms, creating an all-hands link for the Our Father, and using the Stations of the Cross to honor slain individuals (one year, 38 people died within three blocks of Sacred Heart).

The poor need more than our help

The subject of critically acclaimed documentaries and many articles for his unceasing efforts to reclaim the city that was once a thriving hub of industry, Msgr. Doyle gave real examples of how liturgy can be balm in Gilead to those who struggle daily to subsist in neighborhoods marked by poverty, urban decay and drug abuse.

“Honor the poor,” Msgr. Doyle said. “Don’t just help them.”

Among the most moving illustrations, an Advent liturgy in which the entire congregation gathers to bless the women who are with child during the holy season of expectation, a special blessing of seeds for the garden on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception and liturgies that celebrate the role of grandparents in “passing the treasure of faith” on to new generations.

 


Learn more about Georgian Court University’s master’s degree or certificate program in theology, or the new online graduate certificate in Mercy Spirituality, now available to anyone—anywhere—who is interested in the Mercy spiritual tradition.


 

We should be ‘doing Mass’

During his introduction, Dr. Joseph Gower, professor and chair of GCU’s Department of Religious Studies and Theology, which sponsored the ceremony, noted that Msgr. Doyle doesn’t just preach the gospel, he lives it. He called Doyle an authentic witness to the Gospel.

Agreeing to that sentiment after the presentation was inductee Rod Colon who found Msgr. Doyle’s approach to the liturgy profoundly moving. He was especially taken by Msgr. Doyle’s gentle and “unique” focus on looking to the simple and ordinary for uplifting inspiration.

“His thoughts on Church as community, on ‘doing Mass, not just being at Mass’ and doing your bit to help a world that is so self-centered are messages that need to be heard,” Colon said. “We need to bring the secular and the spiritual closer together and he’s a good advocate for that.”

Contributed by freelance writer Lois Rogers

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