Georgian Court Commitment to Sustainability Honored by State Environmental Experts

LAKEWOOD, N.J. (December 17, 2014)—Georgian Court University was recently honored with the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award, which recognizes environmental, academic, business, government, civic and citizen leadership from across New Jersey for their efforts to protect and enhance the state’s environment.

IMG_0740

 New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin (l) with GCU Director of Sustainability Louise Wootton, Ph.D., 2014 biology graduate Katelyn Hanson, and Deputy Commissioner John Giordano.
 

Recognizing Environmental Excellence

GCU’s comprehensive approach to sustainability was highlighted during a ceremony hosted by the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection. The annual awards program highlights winners chosen by a panel of judges who review and score nominations that feature unique or valuable environmental projects and activities.

Georgian Court, which won in the Health & Sustainable Communities category, was one of two universities honored among the 12 GEEA recipients.

“This is a tremendous honor for GCU,” said Louise Wootton, Ph.D., who is director of sustainability and chair of the biology department at Georgian Court. “It’s a testament to the leadership of S. Rosemary Jeffries, who was among the first university presidents to sign on to the ACUPCC agreement, setting the course for the university to become carbon neutral by 2050, as well as to commitment of all at GCU who have been working to make GCU more sustainable.”

IMG_0736

The award represents a true team effort. GCU’s hardworking facilities staff continue to implement sustainable landscaping practices and install energy and water efficient fixtures, and faculty, students and staff last year helped the university achieve a 75 percent recycling rate while conserving energy and water conservation by changing individual behaviors. The student body, including researchers like Katelyn Hanson ’14 (left), also contribute in various ways.

 

What does sustainability look like at GCU?

In 2007, Georgian Court University was one of the first higher education institutions in the nation to commit to carbon neutrality. The university, based in Lakewood, demonstrates its commitment to sustainability through curriculum, campus activities, facilities management, business practice, and community engagement. GCU’s Wellness Center was built to LEED Gold standards established by the U.S. Green Building Council. The campus installed 2,500 solar panels to provide 900 KWH of electricity; added electric carts to the campus vehicle fleet, replaced older and inefficient vehicles, installed 80 low-flow shower heads in residence halls, and installed ceramic window films over 200 large windows to increase insulation. The university maintains the Mercy Garden and Wellness Garden, which promotes sustainable gardening practices and provides fresh produces to families through Catholic Charities. In 2014, GCU placed 4th among 272 institutions for its 75 percent recycling rate in the 2014 “Recyclemania” contest. Georgian Court also hosts a $250,000 experimental stormwater basin research project in partnership with Rutgers University.

“The award also recognizes the important environmental leadership being shown through projects such as the gravel storm water basin research currently being carried out on campus, and community service projects, such as the Mercy Garden,” said Dr. Wootton, who attended the awards program with recent biology graduate Katelyn Hanson, who helped install energy-saving ceramic window films in the university’s main academic building. “This honor validates the fact that GCU is truly living the Sisters of Mercy’s commitment to stewardship of the earth.”

Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Bob Martin applauded the winners at the December 8 ceremony in Trenton.

“The Christie Administration is committed to protecting New Jersey’s environment,” he said. “Through their dedication to environmental protection, these award winners set an example for everyone to follow. The winners and all of those who participated have set a very high standard for environmental excellence. Governor Christie and I commend their leadership.”

About the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Awards

The 15th annual awards program is co-sponsored by DEP and the New Jersey Corporation for Advanced Technology (NJCAT), in partnership with the State League of Municipalities. NJCAT Technical Director Dr. Richard Magee, an avid supporter of GEEA for the past 15 years, was recognized by Commissioner Martin for dedication to the environment and this awards program. A panel of judges reviewed and scored nominations that featured unique or valuable environmental projects and activities. For more on GEEA visit: http://www.nj.gov/dep/eeawards/

About Sustainability at Georgian Court University

Georgian Court University sits on a 156-acre campus of spectacular beauty, a mix of old and new buildings, and serves a community of students, faculty and staff that have always respected and appreciated the environment the campus offers. GCU demonstrates its ongoing commitment to sustainability through its curriculum, campus activities, facilities management, university business practices, community engagement, and leadership among its peers in higher education. The university itself is a place of stunning beauty where the GCU faculty and staff share a dedication to teaching and mentoring students that is uncompromised by other priorities; they guide students as they are guided themselves—by the Mercy core values—and prepare graduates to go on to do many things, each living self-determined lives of service, leadership, and joyful purpose.  GCU’s commitment to sustainability is equally strong. More than 20 plus projects and campus initiatives contribute to the building of healthy and sustainable communities as GCU (1) implements activities that address pollution/waste reduction, recycling, land use, local purchasing, sustainability, and resource conservation; and (2) cultivates its Mercy Garden as the focal point of a community-based initiative to encourage involvement, action and direct assistance for some of Ocean County’s most vulnerable, low-income residents.

LAKEWOOD, N.J. (December 17, 2014)—Georgian Court University was recently honored with the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award, which recognizes environmental, academic, business, government, civic and citizen leadership from across New Jersey for their efforts to protect and enhance the state’s environment.

IMG_0740

 New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin (l) with GCU Director of Sustainability Louise Wootton, Ph.D., 2014 biology graduate Katelyn Hanson, and Deputy Commissioner John Giordano.
 

Recognizing Environmental Excellence

GCU’s comprehensive approach to sustainability was highlighted during a ceremony hosted by the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection. The annual awards program highlights winners chosen by a panel of judges who review and score nominations that feature unique or valuable environmental projects and activities.

Georgian Court, which won in the Health & Sustainable Communities category, was one of two universities honored among the 12 GEEA recipients.

“This is a tremendous honor for GCU,” said Louise Wootton, Ph.D., who is director of sustainability and chair of the biology department at Georgian Court. “It’s a testament to the leadership of S. Rosemary Jeffries, who was among the first university presidents to sign on to the ACUPCC agreement, setting the course for the university to become carbon neutral by 2050, as well as to commitment of all at GCU who have been working to make GCU more sustainable.”

IMG_0736

The award represents a true team effort. GCU’s hardworking facilities staff continue to implement sustainable landscaping practices and install energy and water efficient fixtures, and faculty, students and staff last year helped the university achieve a 75 percent recycling rate while conserving energy and water conservation by changing individual behaviors. The student body, including researchers like Katelyn Hanson ’14 (left), also contribute in various ways.

 

What does sustainability look like at GCU?

In 2007, Georgian Court University was one of the first higher education institutions in the nation to commit to carbon neutrality. The university, based in Lakewood, demonstrates its commitment to sustainability through curriculum, campus activities, facilities management, business practice, and community engagement. GCU’s Wellness Center was built to LEED Gold standards established by the U.S. Green Building Council. The campus installed 2,500 solar panels to provide 900 KWH of electricity; added electric carts to the campus vehicle fleet, replaced older and inefficient vehicles, installed 80 low-flow shower heads in residence halls, and installed ceramic window films over 200 large windows to increase insulation. The university maintains the Mercy Garden and Wellness Garden, which promotes sustainable gardening practices and provides fresh produces to families through Catholic Charities. In 2014, GCU placed 4th among 272 institutions for its 75 percent recycling rate in the 2014 “Recyclemania” contest. Georgian Court also hosts a $250,000 experimental stormwater basin research project in partnership with Rutgers University.

“The award also recognizes the important environmental leadership being shown through projects such as the gravel storm water basin research currently being carried out on campus, and community service projects, such as the Mercy Garden,” said Dr. Wootton, who attended the awards program with recent biology graduate Katelyn Hanson, who helped install energy-saving ceramic window films in the university’s main academic building. “This honor validates the fact that GCU is truly living the Sisters of Mercy’s commitment to stewardship of the earth.”

Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Bob Martin applauded the winners at the December 8 ceremony in Trenton.

“The Christie Administration is committed to protecting New Jersey’s environment,” he said. “Through their dedication to environmental protection, these award winners set an example for everyone to follow. The winners and all of those who participated have set a very high standard for environmental excellence. Governor Christie and I commend their leadership.”

About the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Awards

The 15th annual awards program is co-sponsored by DEP and the New Jersey Corporation for Advanced Technology (NJCAT), in partnership with the State League of Municipalities. NJCAT Technical Director Dr. Richard Magee, an avid supporter of GEEA for the past 15 years, was recognized by Commissioner Martin for dedication to the environment and this awards program. A panel of judges reviewed and scored nominations that featured unique or valuable environmental projects and activities. For more on GEEA visit: http://www.nj.gov/dep/eeawards/

About Sustainability at Georgian Court University

Georgian Court University sits on a 156-acre campus of spectacular beauty, a mix of old and new buildings, and serves a community of students, faculty and staff that have always respected and appreciated the environment the campus offers. GCU demonstrates its ongoing commitment to sustainability through its curriculum, campus activities, facilities management, university business practices, community engagement, and leadership among its peers in higher education. The university itself is a place of stunning beauty where the GCU faculty and staff share a dedication to teaching and mentoring students that is uncompromised by other priorities; they guide students as they are guided themselves—by the Mercy core values—and prepare graduates to go on to do many things, each living self-determined lives of service, leadership, and joyful purpose.  GCU’s commitment to sustainability is equally strong. More than 20 plus projects and campus initiatives contribute to the building of healthy and sustainable communities as GCU (1) implements activities that address pollution/waste reduction, recycling, land use, local purchasing, sustainability, and resource conservation; and (2) cultivates its Mercy Garden as the focal point of a community-based initiative to encourage involvement, action and direct assistance for some of Ocean County’s most vulnerable, low-income residents.

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