GCU Special Report: Status of Girls in New Jersey

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The Status of Girls in New Jersey, a new Georgian Court University report focused on New Jersey girls ages 10 to 19, offers a revealing look at the many issues that shape their lives.

From the likelihood that they will earn a college degree to the percentage of girls living in poverty, The Status of Girls in New Jersey gives policymakers, public and private institutions, and advocacy organizations an enormous amount of data to help guide the decisions that affect girls and young women in New Jersey. The report was compiled by GCU faculty researchers, who were led by Provost Evelyn Saul Quinn, M.S.W., M.Ed., ’74. The project began in 2011 when the provost talked with Alverno College President Mary J. Meehan (also a GCU trustee) about her school’s successful report on the status of girls in Wisconsin. Now, with the recent release of the Status of Girls in New Jersey, GCU joins several universities and colleges nationwide that are presenting data to improve the lives of girls.

While GCU went fully coeducational this fall, the well-being of women remains an enduring central value of Georgian Court. The university’s historic “special concern for women” is at the root of the special calling envisioned by Mother Catherine McAuley, foundress of the Sisters of Mercy. “This project is, therefore, a perfect fit for our university,” said Provost Quinn. “Women have come so far and accomplished so much, but there is so much more to do.”

This story originally appeared in the Fall/Winter 2013 edition of GCU Magazine as “The Status of Girls in New Jersey: A Special Report by GCU,” by Gretchen Van Benthuysen.

Student image

The Status of Girls in New Jersey, a new Georgian Court University report focused on New Jersey girls ages 10 to 19, offers a revealing look at the many issues that shape their lives.

From the likelihood that they will earn a college degree to the percentage of girls living in poverty, The Status of Girls in New Jersey gives policymakers, public and private institutions, and advocacy organizations an enormous amount of data to help guide the decisions that affect girls and young women in New Jersey. The report was compiled by GCU faculty researchers, who were led by Provost Evelyn Saul Quinn, M.S.W., M.Ed., ’74. The project began in 2011 when the provost talked with Alverno College President Mary J. Meehan (also a GCU trustee) about her school’s successful report on the status of girls in Wisconsin. Now, with the recent release of the Status of Girls in New Jersey, GCU joins several universities and colleges nationwide that are presenting data to improve the lives of girls.

While GCU went fully coeducational this fall, the well-being of women remains an enduring central value of Georgian Court. The university’s historic “special concern for women” is at the root of the special calling envisioned by Mother Catherine McAuley, foundress of the Sisters of Mercy. “This project is, therefore, a perfect fit for our university,” said Provost Quinn. “Women have come so far and accomplished so much, but there is so much more to do.”

This story originally appeared in the Fall/Winter 2013 edition of GCU Magazine as “The Status of Girls in New Jersey: A Special Report by GCU,” by Gretchen Van Benthuysen.

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