GCU Salutes the Sisters of Mercy

Over a century ago, seven Sisters of Mercy made their way to Jersey City and, by today’s standards, lived in less than optimal conditions. Their sacrifice and contributions, however, paved the way for what would become a community of Mercy sisters living and serving throughout the mid-Atlantic region, and their work would become the foundation for Georgian Court University.

“Their legacy continues,” said GCU Vice President of Mission Integration Evelyn Quinn ’74 during GCU’s observance of National Catholic Sisters Week 2015. “That’s the future of Mercy. The call is great, the joys uncountable. The future of Mercy is secure because our students are washed in Mercy.”

Georgian Court marked its first NCSW observance with a special mass, a luncheon held in honor of the Sisters of Mercy, GCU’s sponsoring order, and the first full showing of an oral history video produced by GCU students.

The project, part of the National Catholic Sisters Week effort led by St. Catherine’s University, includes the voices of well-known women religious like social justice advocate Sister Theresa Kane and those who work just as hard behind the scenes.

“We are women of prayer and mercy and service,” said Mercy Sister Elaine Diaz.” The blessing has been in what I’ve received and the people I have served.”

Said Sister Theresa Kane: “Mercy is a call to do something bigger than myself. It’s a spiritual awakening to do something very connected to God.”


Religious life is not about sitting still. It’s a call to community, a call to action and a call to prayer. It’s that call to radical availability, boundless compassion and abundant generosity.

— Sr. Deborah Borneman


“At mass this past weekend, it was said that God is ‘author of all things Mercy,'” GCU graduating senior Lindsay Taft remarked. “Well, if God is the author, then the Sisters of Mercy are surely the pen. They are vessels of His blessings, putting forth God’s mission to all they encounter.”

Faculty members, alumni, GCU staff and others thanked the Sisters at the luncheon, hosted in GCU’s historic mansion on campus. Tribute after tribute, they credited women religious for the influence and impact they’ve had through education, social services, healthcare, ministry and more.

“We’ve been blessed to walk this journey with you,” GCU President Rosemary E. Jeffries, RSM, Ph.D., ’72 said. “We stand on the shoulders of these Sisters,” she added, acknowledging the leadership of former Georgian Court presidents Sister Maria Cordis ’50, and Sister Barbara Williams.

 

 

Over a century ago, seven Sisters of Mercy made their way to Jersey City and, by today’s standards, lived in less than optimal conditions. Their sacrifice and contributions, however, paved the way for what would become a community of Mercy sisters living and serving throughout the mid-Atlantic region, and their work would become the foundation for Georgian Court University.

“Their legacy continues,” said GCU Vice President of Mission Integration Evelyn Quinn ’74 during GCU’s observance of National Catholic Sisters Week 2015. “That’s the future of Mercy. The call is great, the joys uncountable. The future of Mercy is secure because our students are washed in Mercy.”

Georgian Court marked its first NCSW observance with a special mass, a luncheon held in honor of the Sisters of Mercy, GCU’s sponsoring order, and the first full showing of an oral history video produced by GCU students.

The project, part of the National Catholic Sisters Week effort led by St. Catherine’s University, includes the voices of well-known women religious like social justice advocate Sister Theresa Kane and those who work just as hard behind the scenes.

“We are women of prayer and mercy and service,” said Mercy Sister Elaine Diaz.” The blessing has been in what I’ve received and the people I have served.”

Said Sister Theresa Kane: “Mercy is a call to do something bigger than myself. It’s a spiritual awakening to do something very connected to God.”


Religious life is not about sitting still. It’s a call to community, a call to action and a call to prayer. It’s that call to radical availability, boundless compassion and abundant generosity.

— Sr. Deborah Borneman


“At mass this past weekend, it was said that God is ‘author of all things Mercy,'” GCU graduating senior Lindsay Taft remarked. “Well, if God is the author, then the Sisters of Mercy are surely the pen. They are vessels of His blessings, putting forth God’s mission to all they encounter.”

Faculty members, alumni, GCU staff and others thanked the Sisters at the luncheon, hosted in GCU’s historic mansion on campus. Tribute after tribute, they credited women religious for the influence and impact they’ve had through education, social services, healthcare, ministry and more.

“We’ve been blessed to walk this journey with you,” GCU President Rosemary E. Jeffries, RSM, Ph.D., ’72 said. “We stand on the shoulders of these Sisters,” she added, acknowledging the leadership of former Georgian Court presidents Sister Maria Cordis ’50, and Sister Barbara Williams.

 

 

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