GCU Leads Local Students on Academic Hunt for the Jersey Devil

Lakewood Middle School students worked with the Georgian Court University library to explore  research techniques and find valid information on the famed and elusive Jersey Devil.

In search of the Jersey Devil

After a full day on campus during the spring of 2014, Lakewood Middle School students left Georgian Court University as certified “Jersey Devil Detectives.”

In the modern world, dismantling information has become increasingly more important. That’s why Georgian Court University librarian Barbara Herbert launched a program to lead sixth-graders on an academic search for the Jersey Devil using various sources.

Honors students from Lakewood Middle School visited the Sister Mary Joseph Cunningham Library at GCU and were given a list of sources and information to distinguish its validity. About 50 sixth-graders were split into two groups on the day of their visit.

Ms. Herbert explained that the children were asked to evaluate using the “Who, What, When, Where, Why” method.

The full guide can be found, here, http://libguides.georgian.edu/jerseydevil.

 

Source material

Some of the sources they evaluated included an article in The Trentonian from 1909 that claimed to offer eyewitness accounts of Jersey Devil sightings, as well as, the Jersey Devil Wikipedia entry, a handwritten note from Bruce Springsteen and a History Channel documentary.

“They asked some very good questions about some of the sites we found,” Ms. Herbert explained.

The idea came to her after seeing an article in the Associate of College & Research Libraries  about an academic research hunt for Bigfoot. She decided to make her search more Jersey friendly, by choosing the Jersey Devil. She explained that the librarians who authored the piece were of great assistance on her project and even followed up the day after the Lakewood Together program to see how it went.

(Initially, the library was not part of Lakewood Together, but Ms. Herbert mentioned the idea and the GCU School of Education felt it was a great fit.)

The program was mutually beneficial for both the Lakewood students and Georgian Court.

“The side benefit was that since the Lakewood district is not an affluent community, many of the students were from immigrant families and many of them don’t aspire to go to college,” Ms. Herbert said. “So by spending the day on campus they got to see what college was like and many of them said they would like to attend Georgian Court when they go to college.”

The students were given a tour of the campus, including the dorms, and all joined each other for lunch in the cafeteria, which was a big hit.

Students and staff from GCU made the day a success; the library plans to team up with Lakewood Middle School once again due to the day’s success.

“It was fun,” Ms. Herbert said. “The students were thrilled.”

A group effort

Bridgit Valenti, the Lakewood Middle School librarian, was also instrumental in helping Herbert put together the program.Teachers Vicent Floria, Maryellen Klotz and GCU student teacher, Eric Malone, accompanied the students throughout their learning during the day.

In addition, Frances Scott, Director of Library Services, provided assistance during the research lessons. Dr. Kathleen Froriep, Professor of Education, and Stacey Spina, Library Assistant, conducted the campus tours. While library Assistants Susan Mirra and Betty McBain conducted library tours. Lou Toscano, also a library assistant, assembled the student folders, Ms. Herbert said.  Amanda MacPhee ’14, a student library assistant, also assisted in the project by putting together the materials for the sixth-graders. Associate Provost for Student Affairs Karen Goff and GCU School of Education Dean Lynn DeCapua welcomed the students upon arrival and Sister Rosemary visited the teachers and students at lunch.  Residence Life Director Gary Miller gave residence hall tours.

Each student was given a folder, criteria checklist and schedule for the day. Sister Rosemary also requested a folder to be used as an artifact for Middle States accreditation purposes, Herbert added.

After the day concluded, students returned to class to conduct follow-up exercises to test their new skills. Each student left with a “Jersey Devil Detective” certificate, so they could remember their experience and the skills learned on the campus of GCU.

For more information on the educational Jersey Devil hunt, visit: http://libguides.georgian.edu/jerseydevil.

 

 

Lakewood Middle School students worked with the Georgian Court University library to explore  research techniques and find valid information on the famed and elusive Jersey Devil.

In search of the Jersey Devil

After a full day on campus during the spring of 2014, Lakewood Middle School students left Georgian Court University as certified “Jersey Devil Detectives.”

In the modern world, dismantling information has become increasingly more important. That’s why Georgian Court University librarian Barbara Herbert launched a program to lead sixth-graders on an academic search for the Jersey Devil using various sources.

Honors students from Lakewood Middle School visited the Sister Mary Joseph Cunningham Library at GCU and were given a list of sources and information to distinguish its validity. About 50 sixth-graders were split into two groups on the day of their visit.

Ms. Herbert explained that the children were asked to evaluate using the “Who, What, When, Where, Why” method.

The full guide can be found, here, http://libguides.georgian.edu/jerseydevil.

 

Source material

Some of the sources they evaluated included an article in The Trentonian from 1909 that claimed to offer eyewitness accounts of Jersey Devil sightings, as well as, the Jersey Devil Wikipedia entry, a handwritten note from Bruce Springsteen and a History Channel documentary.

“They asked some very good questions about some of the sites we found,” Ms. Herbert explained.

The idea came to her after seeing an article in the Associate of College & Research Libraries  about an academic research hunt for Bigfoot. She decided to make her search more Jersey friendly, by choosing the Jersey Devil. She explained that the librarians who authored the piece were of great assistance on her project and even followed up the day after the Lakewood Together program to see how it went.

(Initially, the library was not part of Lakewood Together, but Ms. Herbert mentioned the idea and the GCU School of Education felt it was a great fit.)

The program was mutually beneficial for both the Lakewood students and Georgian Court.

“The side benefit was that since the Lakewood district is not an affluent community, many of the students were from immigrant families and many of them don’t aspire to go to college,” Ms. Herbert said. “So by spending the day on campus they got to see what college was like and many of them said they would like to attend Georgian Court when they go to college.”

The students were given a tour of the campus, including the dorms, and all joined each other for lunch in the cafeteria, which was a big hit.

Students and staff from GCU made the day a success; the library plans to team up with Lakewood Middle School once again due to the day’s success.

“It was fun,” Ms. Herbert said. “The students were thrilled.”

A group effort

Bridgit Valenti, the Lakewood Middle School librarian, was also instrumental in helping Herbert put together the program.Teachers Vicent Floria, Maryellen Klotz and GCU student teacher, Eric Malone, accompanied the students throughout their learning during the day.

In addition, Frances Scott, Director of Library Services, provided assistance during the research lessons. Dr. Kathleen Froriep, Professor of Education, and Stacey Spina, Library Assistant, conducted the campus tours. While library Assistants Susan Mirra and Betty McBain conducted library tours. Lou Toscano, also a library assistant, assembled the student folders, Ms. Herbert said.  Amanda MacPhee ’14, a student library assistant, also assisted in the project by putting together the materials for the sixth-graders. Associate Provost for Student Affairs Karen Goff and GCU School of Education Dean Lynn DeCapua welcomed the students upon arrival and Sister Rosemary visited the teachers and students at lunch.  Residence Life Director Gary Miller gave residence hall tours.

Each student was given a folder, criteria checklist and schedule for the day. Sister Rosemary also requested a folder to be used as an artifact for Middle States accreditation purposes, Herbert added.

After the day concluded, students returned to class to conduct follow-up exercises to test their new skills. Each student left with a “Jersey Devil Detective” certificate, so they could remember their experience and the skills learned on the campus of GCU.

For more information on the educational Jersey Devil hunt, visit: http://libguides.georgian.edu/jerseydevil.

 

 

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