GCU Accreditations: The Mark of a Fine University

Georgian Court University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, an independent organization that is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education to conduct accreditation and re-accreditation of colleges and universities. However, that’s just the beginning of the many endorsements, certifications and accreditations GCU’s individual programs need to be competitive.

Additional accreditation for various undergraduate and graduate programs are increasingly preferred by both students and employers, and in recent months, several GCU programs have received the stamp of approval. For example:

— Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program is backed by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

— School Psychology earned accreditation from the National Association of School Psychologists

— The GCU-Meridian Health School of Nursing is approved by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

— The School of Business was reaccredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs; and

— The School of Education recently earned high marks from the Teacher Education Accreditation Council

“The issue of accreditation is becoming more and more salient,” said Joseph Springer, Ph.D., director of GCU’s graduate program in clinical mental health counseling. “Before it was a nice thing to have. The process is expensive and labor intensive so it’s easier to kick it down the road. The impetus is not always there.” 

Yet, he points out, if students want to work for organizations like the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, they must have attended a CACREP-approved school.  

The GCU process seeking accreditation began about five or six years ago, he said. Getting CACREP accreditation tells prospective employers that GCU students participated in a rigorous program and met certain standards, Dr. Springer said. Most state licensing boards consider CACREP-accreditation to represent the “gold standard.”

Accreditation is critical to giving students a leg up in the healthcare job market, according to Teri Wurmser, Ph.D., co-director of the GCU-Meridian Health School of Nursing.

Said Dr. Wurmser about the four-year, bachelor of science nursing degree program: “If we didn’t get accredited, the students might not get into grad school since most schools want accreditation. Accreditation means you’ve met certain national standards. It’s kind of like stamp of approval.”

But the nursing school couldn’t apply for accreditation until it had one class graduated, which happened in 2012. After hosting an intense site visit and filing exhaustive reports, accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education was granted in October 2012.

Such accreditations both bolster the appeal of the school to a broader pool of potential students and offer additional assurance of the quality of a Georgian Court education. The “stamp of approval” that these accreditations offer are further evidence that a great education starts at Georgian Court University.

The original version of this story was published in the Fall/Winter 2014 issue of Georgian Court University magazine with the title, “Stamps of Approval,” by Gretchen Benthuysen.

 

 

 

 

 

Georgian Court University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, an independent organization that is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education to conduct accreditation and re-accreditation of colleges and universities. However, that’s just the beginning of the many endorsements, certifications and accreditations GCU’s individual programs need to be competitive.

Additional accreditation for various undergraduate and graduate programs are increasingly preferred by both students and employers, and in recent months, several GCU programs have received the stamp of approval. For example:

— Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program is backed by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

— School Psychology earned accreditation from the National Association of School Psychologists

— The GCU-Meridian Health School of Nursing is approved by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

— The School of Business was reaccredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs; and

— The School of Education recently earned high marks from the Teacher Education Accreditation Council

“The issue of accreditation is becoming more and more salient,” said Joseph Springer, Ph.D., director of GCU’s graduate program in clinical mental health counseling. “Before it was a nice thing to have. The process is expensive and labor intensive so it’s easier to kick it down the road. The impetus is not always there.” 

Yet, he points out, if students want to work for organizations like the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, they must have attended a CACREP-approved school.  

The GCU process seeking accreditation began about five or six years ago, he said. Getting CACREP accreditation tells prospective employers that GCU students participated in a rigorous program and met certain standards, Dr. Springer said. Most state licensing boards consider CACREP-accreditation to represent the “gold standard.”

Accreditation is critical to giving students a leg up in the healthcare job market, according to Teri Wurmser, Ph.D., co-director of the GCU-Meridian Health School of Nursing.

Said Dr. Wurmser about the four-year, bachelor of science nursing degree program: “If we didn’t get accredited, the students might not get into grad school since most schools want accreditation. Accreditation means you’ve met certain national standards. It’s kind of like stamp of approval.”

But the nursing school couldn’t apply for accreditation until it had one class graduated, which happened in 2012. After hosting an intense site visit and filing exhaustive reports, accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education was granted in October 2012.

Such accreditations both bolster the appeal of the school to a broader pool of potential students and offer additional assurance of the quality of a Georgian Court education. The “stamp of approval” that these accreditations offer are further evidence that a great education starts at Georgian Court University.

The original version of this story was published in the Fall/Winter 2014 issue of Georgian Court University magazine with the title, “Stamps of Approval,” by Gretchen Benthuysen.

 

 

 

 

 

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