Graduate to Classmates: ‘We are Blessed’

jennifer bumbico

Seven Catholic school educators are among the first to finish a GCU program in administration and leadership launched in partnership with the Diocese of Trenton.  Jennifer Bumbico, a teacher at St. Mary’s school in Middletown, graduated and offered remarks at GCU’s 2015 commencement.

Sister Rosemary Jeffries, Honorees Father Alphonse Stephenson and Sister Mary Lou Miller, members of the Board of Trustees, honored guests, administrators, faculty, staff, alumni, parents, friends, and most especially, my fellow graduates: Good evening! It is my distinct honor to stand before you and welcome you to the Commencement ceremonies for the GCU graduate Class of 2015.

Yes, believe it or not, we are here. We made it. We accomplished what we thought at the beginning of our journey was impossible. Yes, that moment that we all swore was never going to come, that moment that we were so willing to almost give up or put on hold. But, we didn’t. We persevered through all the research, the internships, the coursework, the cramming, and late-night study sessions—most of this while working full time. Our diploma did not come easy, and for this we should feel accomplished. We are the few. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 9.4% of the U.S. population holds a graduate degree. We have just joined that small percentage!

We are blessed to have had this experience here at GCU. Georgian Court is unique to many schools. A few years ago, we had a dream of continuing our education and we perused it; just as Sister Catherine McAuley had a dream of making a difference by founding the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland in 1831. As the Sisters spread worldwide, their tenacity led to the creation of Georgian Court in 1908.

As said best by St. Francis of Assisi: “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”


GCU has provided us with many tools that have helped to mold us on our journey to graduation. We have been fortunate to learn in an atmosphere where small class sizes allowed us to develop meaningful and long-term relationships with our classmates and professors. Here at GCU, we have received our education in the Roman Catholic tradition focused around the core values of respect, integrity, justice, compassion, and service.

 


CATHOLIC EDUCATION, MERCY VALUES

Respect: Respect has been incorporated into all aspects of our graduate experience. Our professors have guided us along our journey and have helped us find our inner strengths. They led us to reach our full abilities while respecting us as unique individuals.

Integrity: In the competitive world today, many of us find ourselves questioning how can we get to the top and achieve our goals. Our education from GCU has provided us with the ability to follow our moral and ethical convictions to do the right thing. With integrity we have the strength to be true to ourselves, while at the same time, reach milestones in our lives.

Justice: Justice is a concept of moral rightness based on ethics, rationality, law, natural law, religion, or equity. As graduate students, we have the knowledge to be rational in our thinking and the ability to make just decisions.

Compassion: When you show compassion to others, you actively choose to go out of your way to help the physical, spiritual, or emotional hurts or pains of another. Our graduate school experience has taught us how to be compassionate in all our actions, not only to ourselves, but also to others.

Service: Acts of service help to remind us of our purpose on this Earth. Service work is beneficial not only to our communities, but to our own souls. As we hear in the Prayer of St. Francis, “It is in giving that we receive.”


 

If I were to skip back a few years ago, never would I have expected to be standing here where I am today. Deciding to continue my education was by far one of my best decisions that I have made in my life. Although my bank account may beg to differ, choosing to expand my knowledge and expose myself to new opportunities through my graduate studies here at GCU cannot be labeled with a price tag.

If we are able to use the skills we have established through our graduate studies here at GCU, we will be able to conquer any challenges that come before us.

The past two-and-a-half years have been priceless! I am extremely grateful and forever thankful for my principal encouraging me to participate in the Catholic School cohort program. Attending a university where my classmates and my professors held the same values and beliefs has inspired me to become a better person. As a teacher in a Catholic school, I truly value the gift of Catholic education and believe sharing the Gospel with our children is our most important job here on this Earth.

jennifer_bumbico_speaksWhether you are graduating from the School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business, or the School of Education, you will be able to use the values gained from your studies here at GCU to assist you throughout your life and career. Take a moment; look around at your classmates, professors, family, and friends. Think about all the hard work and dedication that you have put into receiving this degree. Although we may be proud and feel accomplished, this is not the end; this is just the beginning.

I leave you with these pieces of advice. First, remember to pray every day. Keeping a relationship with Christ is crucial for our souls. Second, always take time to reflect on your accomplishments and enjoy life to its fullest. If we are able to use the skills we have established through our graduate studies here at GCU, we will be able to conquer any challenges that come before us. Lastly, always remember to set goals for yourself every day; attainable goals and goals that seem unattainable. Aim high; the sky is the limit. As said best by St. Francis of Assisi: “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

— Jennifer Bumbico | Photos by William Thomas Cain

Seven Catholic school educators are among the first to finish a GCU program in administration and leadership launched in partnership with the Diocese of Trenton.  Jennifer Bumbico, a teacher at St. Mary’s school in Middletown, graduated and offered remarks at GCU’s 2015 commencement.

Sister Rosemary Jeffries, Honorees Father Alphonse Stephenson and Sister Mary Lou Miller, members of the Board of Trustees, honored guests, administrators, faculty, staff, alumni, parents, friends, and most especially, my fellow graduates: Good evening! It is my distinct honor to stand before you and welcome you to the Commencement ceremonies for the GCU graduate Class of 2015.

Yes, believe it or not, we are here. We made it. We accomplished what we thought at the beginning of our journey was impossible. Yes, that moment that we all swore was never going to come, that moment that we were so willing to almost give up or put on hold. But, we didn’t. We persevered through all the research, the internships, the coursework, the cramming, and late-night study sessions—most of this while working full time. Our diploma did not come easy, and for this we should feel accomplished. We are the few. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 9.4% of the U.S. population holds a graduate degree. We have just joined that small percentage!

We are blessed to have had this experience here at GCU. Georgian Court is unique to many schools. A few years ago, we had a dream of continuing our education and we perused it; just as Sister Catherine McAuley had a dream of making a difference by founding the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland in 1831. As the Sisters spread worldwide, their tenacity led to the creation of Georgian Court in 1908.

As said best by St. Francis of Assisi: “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”


GCU has provided us with many tools that have helped to mold us on our journey to graduation. We have been fortunate to learn in an atmosphere where small class sizes allowed us to develop meaningful and long-term relationships with our classmates and professors. Here at GCU, we have received our education in the Roman Catholic tradition focused around the core values of respect, integrity, justice, compassion, and service.

 


CATHOLIC EDUCATION, MERCY VALUES

Respect: Respect has been incorporated into all aspects of our graduate experience. Our professors have guided us along our journey and have helped us find our inner strengths. They led us to reach our full abilities while respecting us as unique individuals.

Integrity: In the competitive world today, many of us find ourselves questioning how can we get to the top and achieve our goals. Our education from GCU has provided us with the ability to follow our moral and ethical convictions to do the right thing. With integrity we have the strength to be true to ourselves, while at the same time, reach milestones in our lives.

Justice: Justice is a concept of moral rightness based on ethics, rationality, law, natural law, religion, or equity. As graduate students, we have the knowledge to be rational in our thinking and the ability to make just decisions.

Compassion: When you show compassion to others, you actively choose to go out of your way to help the physical, spiritual, or emotional hurts or pains of another. Our graduate school experience has taught us how to be compassionate in all our actions, not only to ourselves, but also to others.

Service: Acts of service help to remind us of our purpose on this Earth. Service work is beneficial not only to our communities, but to our own souls. As we hear in the Prayer of St. Francis, “It is in giving that we receive.”


 

If I were to skip back a few years ago, never would I have expected to be standing here where I am today. Deciding to continue my education was by far one of my best decisions that I have made in my life. Although my bank account may beg to differ, choosing to expand my knowledge and expose myself to new opportunities through my graduate studies here at GCU cannot be labeled with a price tag.

If we are able to use the skills we have established through our graduate studies here at GCU, we will be able to conquer any challenges that come before us.

The past two-and-a-half years have been priceless! I am extremely grateful and forever thankful for my principal encouraging me to participate in the Catholic School cohort program. Attending a university where my classmates and my professors held the same values and beliefs has inspired me to become a better person. As a teacher in a Catholic school, I truly value the gift of Catholic education and believe sharing the Gospel with our children is our most important job here on this Earth.

jennifer_bumbico_speaksWhether you are graduating from the School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business, or the School of Education, you will be able to use the values gained from your studies here at GCU to assist you throughout your life and career. Take a moment; look around at your classmates, professors, family, and friends. Think about all the hard work and dedication that you have put into receiving this degree. Although we may be proud and feel accomplished, this is not the end; this is just the beginning.

I leave you with these pieces of advice. First, remember to pray every day. Keeping a relationship with Christ is crucial for our souls. Second, always take time to reflect on your accomplishments and enjoy life to its fullest. If we are able to use the skills we have established through our graduate studies here at GCU, we will be able to conquer any challenges that come before us. Lastly, always remember to set goals for yourself every day; attainable goals and goals that seem unattainable. Aim high; the sky is the limit. As said best by St. Francis of Assisi: “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

— Jennifer Bumbico | Photos by William Thomas Cain

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