Category: Lectures

Georgian Court Hosts Neuroscience Conference, April 10

Knowing that the brain is the seat of change, some clinical mental health professionals are turning to new tools in neuroscience to improve patients’ lives, according to conference organizers behind Neuroscience: The New Frontier for Mental Health Professionals. The one-day event is slated for Friday, April 10 from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. at Georgian Court University.

Knowing that the brain is the seat of change, some clinical mental health professionals are turning to new tools in neur...

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GCU Hosts Synod Talk on ‘Pastoral Needs of the Family’

Lakewood, N.J. (Oct. 17, 2014)—As the Synod of Bishops in Rome examines some of the most difficult issues surrounding contemporary family life, area Catholics will gather at Georgian Court University to share their own views Saturday, October 25 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The event will take place in the Dorothy Marron University Community Chapel on GCU’s historic Lakewood campus.

Lakewood, N.J. (Oct. 17, 2014)—As the Synod of Bishops in Rome examines some of the most difficult issues surrounding co...

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Visiting Scholar Louis Mazzari, Ph.D., Reflects on Teaching American History—In Istanbul

Georgian Court University welcomes Dr. Louis Mazzari, an assistant professor of American Studies at Bogazici University in Istanbul, Turkey. He is presenting two lectures—one on American writer Philip Wylie on Tuesday, Sept. 30 and another talk on Teaching in Istanbul, Wednesday, Oct. 1. Reservations should be made through GCU’s Office of Conferences and Special Events.

“Last semester I met Louis Mazzari at an American Studies conference in The Hague,” said GCU Professor of History Scott Bennett, Ph.D. “He is a dynamic, articulate, and compelling speaker. Without exaggeration, he is among the finest academic speakers I’ve ever heard.” Currently on sabbatical, Dr. Mazzari is researching a biography of writer Philip Wylie, whose papers are at Princeton University.

Georgian Court University welcomes Dr. Louis Mazzari, an assistant professor of American Studies at Bogazici University...

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When a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet speaks, GCU listens

A night to remember at Georgian Court

Guest post by Charlee Bassillo  ///  Photos by Amanda MacPhee

On April 23, 2013, thanks to diligent preparations made by students and faculty of the Georgian Court University Department of English, Massachusetts native Tracy K. Smith visited for a poetry reading in the Little Theater, an evening event that will surely be held near and dear to the hearts of English majors across campus. GCU’s Dr. Russell McDonald ushered in the visiting poet with a warm welcome and introduction, echoing the pleasure shared by the entire audience to have had the distinct opportunity to meet, greet, and speak with such a highly-esteemed literary voice as Tracy K. Smith, whose 2012 Pulitzer Prize-winning Life on Mars is preceded by the James Laughlin Award-winning Duende and The Body’s Question, a Cave Canem Poetry Prize-winner.

Poet Tracy K. Smith Listening
t113 t108

 

The night’s readings primarily focused on material from her 2012 Pulitzer Prize-winner, Life on Mars, but Smith also surprised guests with a brand new selection, dazzling attendants with her poetic artistry, invigoratingly fresh insight, and meditative prose. ​Explaining that her poetry has blossomed out of life’s perplexing quandaries, both big and small, Ms. Smith’s writing encompasses even day-to-day ponderings, which are, of course, juxtaposed neatly and meaningfully against “big ticket” questions, revealing uncanny connections between unlikely pairings – such as the cosmos versus ordinary, everyday life. Many poems were designated by Smith as being largely elegiac to her father, a retired Space Hubble engineer, though Tracy also discussed the impact of a unique blend of political, personal, and spiritual influences on her writing of Life on Mars, citing a sundry of inspirational sources – from the gassing of geese at JFK airport and seeing her father’s reflection in the impressive stance of a tiger on a magazine page to the contemplation of dark matter – as she demonstrated by sharing the collection’s title poem, Life on Mars,” which begins:

Tina says what if dark matter is like the space between people
When what holds them together isn’t exactly love, and I think
That sounds right – how strong the pull can be, as if something
That knows better won’t let you drift apart so easily, and how
Small and heavy you feel, stuck there spinning in place.

Not only was the audience given a chance to procure a much-coveted autograph, but they also received a precious behind-the-scenes pass to the poet’s mind at work. During the reading, and in this post-reading question and answer session, audience members were afforded the privilege of seeing through the eyes of Tracy K. Smith – as the award-winning author, David Bowie lover, daughter of a dearly loved, but lost, father, and as the new mother. She was witty, approachable, and a master of her trade – her poetry probing for profound meaning and reflecting upon all of life’s significance, wonder, and beauty, however big or small.

Charlee Bassillo is an English and Education major at Georgian Court University where she expects to graduate in Spring 2014 to pursue a career in secondary education.


References

Smith, Tracy K. “Life on Mars.” Life on Mars. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2011. 37 – 42. Print.

A night to remember at Georgian Court Guest post by Charlee Bassillo  ///  Photos by Amanda MacPhee On April 23, 2013, t...

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S. Pat McDermott: Not just a call to holiness, but to ‘wholeness’

S. Pat McDermott, president of the Sisters of Mercy of the Institute of the Americas, recently addressed Georgian Court faculty, students and staff.

S. Pat McDermott, president of the Sisters of Mercy of the Institute of the Americas, recently addressed Georgian Court faculty, students and staff. (Photo/AMANDA MACPHEE)


Guest post courtesy of Michelle Giles, GCU Grants & Advancement Communications Specialist

Sister Pat McDermott, President of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, spoke about Vatican II and the Call to Holiness before a crowd of faculty, staff, and alumnae on the evening of April 25. Vatican II, she said, was an invitation to “change our way of seeing” and the Call to Holiness is also a “Call to Wholeness.” Sister Pat noted that in 1962, she was a freshman in all-women’s Sisters of Mercy High School in Omaha, Nebraska and grew up across the street from a Sisters of Mercy convent. Vatican II, she said, was the most significant event of the 20th century in which three themes emerged for the people of the Catholic faith: self-identity, engagement in the world, and participation and accountability.

Vatican II, she said, invited us to renew our identity as people of God, engage in the world for positive outcomes, and open up dialogue and collaboration. She embraced the words of John Paul XXIII:  “mercy rather than severity.” “The Call to Holiness is not a step away,” Sister Pat said. “The Call to Holiness is the whole of humanity.” Sister Pat also discussed the work of the Sisters of Mercy through social justice and charitable works and highlighted their advocacy, Mercy collaborations, and Mercy Taking Action events. “Nothing is separate in the journey of faith,” she said.

The entire text of S. Pat’s presentation can be viewed at http://www.georgian.edu/events/spm.htm.

 

—-Guest post courtesy of Michelle Giles, GCU Grants & Advancement Communications Specialist

Guest post courtesy of Michelle Giles, GCU Grants & Advancement Communications Specialist Sister Pat McDermott, Pres...

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Kean to GCU: ‘We are safer, but not totally safe’

GCU's Bob Louden, who directs the criminal justice program at the university, joined President Rosemary E. Jeffries (second from left), the Hon. Thomas H. Kean, and Ocean County Prosecutor Marlene Lynch Ford (a GCU alumna), during the event.

More than 250 people turned out to hear former New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean talk about the incredible changes America has seen since the events of Sept. 11, 2001. His talk, “9/11: A Decade Later,” was held in the historic Casino where students, faculty, staff and community residents listened intently to the man who also served as chairman of the 9/11 Commission.

Now more than ever, Americans need to understand that “we cannot go it alone,” Kean told the audience. “If we really cooperate, we can all be safer.”  That level of cooperation extends to supporting countries that are trying to expand their own economic and educational opportunities, as well as supporting democracy abroad.The former governor, who was tapped in 2002 by then-President George W. Bush to lead the investigative commission, talked candidly about the group’s achievements, and goals that have yet to be realized.

“What I learned about secrets in Washington is that they shouldn’t be secrets,” he said, underscoring the need to de-classify information that he believes Americans would be better off knowing.

“Are we safe? Yes, we’re much safer than we were before Sept. 11, but we’re not safe enough, not yet,” he said.

“Our biggest threat today is not in Afghanistan or Pakistan,” he said. “It comes from those wild, ungoverned parts of thw world. They have neither the desire or power for a big attack, but they are likely to plan smaller attacks. We’ve gotten pretty darn good at stopping unwanted people from coming into the country, but what’s happening now is that attackers are recruiting U.S. citizens—over the Internet. We have to be aware of this and get ahead of it.”

Look for extended coverage of Kean’s speech and other related activities in the fall edition of GCU Magazine.

More than 250 people turned out to hear former New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean talk about the incredible changes America...

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