Author Visits GCU to Discuss Mercy in Everyday Life

Kerry Weber will speak to the GCU community about her experiences incorporating the seven Corporal Acts of Mercy into daily life.

Author Kerry Weber will visit Georgian Court University this November to discuss her experience incorporating Mercy into her daily life while still holding onto her day job. Weber, now 32, decided to conduct an experiment when she was 29-years-old where she incorporated the seven Corporal Works of Mercy as part of her Lenten discipline.

The seven Corporal Works of Mercy are to feed the hungry, to give drink to the thirsty, to clothe the naked, to shelter the homeless, to care for the sick, to visit the imprisoned and to bury the dead. Her experiences are described in her book, Mercy in the City: How to Feed the Hungry, Give Drink to the Thirsty, Visit the Imprisoned, and Keep Your Day Job. She has also authored the book Keeping the Faith: Prayers for College Students.

During her public talk, November 18 at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater on GCU’s campus, Weber will share personal examples and stories of Mercy, and will connect her experiences to the tradition of the Sisters of Mercy and GCU. “I plan to discuss some of the main challenges that I’ve faced while trying to commit more fully to the Corporal Works of Mercy, as well as some of the surprising and hopeful things I’ve learned in the process,” Weber said. “So many of these works had an impact on me and the way I view mercy far beyond what I could have imagined.”

GCU Director of Campus Ministry, Jeff Schaffer, invited Weber to speak at GCU on behalf of the Year of Hope Committee. “I thought Kerry’s story would connect with our young adult students as well as the broader community,” Shaffer said.

Weber said she was honored to be invited by Schaffer and is always inspired by the energy and enthusiasm of students. She believes the two core components of mercy are community and building relationships, which is why she enjoys speaking and interacting with students and communities.

“I hope to both speak to my experience in trying to serve others, but also to learn from the joys and challenges that others have faced while trying to live more merciful lives,” she said. After conducting the experiment, Weber has learned to recognize Mercy in unexpected places, she explained. She added that it is more than just an action, but also a mindset. “I think many people already are doing a lot of these works without recognizing it. It’s important to lift up the sacredness of everyday actions,” Weber said.

“I hope our students, and all who attend, will be inspired to live mercy in their everyday lives,” Schaffer said. “Serving the poor and advocating for justice isn’t an intellectual pursuit. Mercy means serving living, breathing human beings and taking concrete action to help.”

Weber is the managing editor of America Magazine, a leading Catholic news magazine. She is currently involved with events and speaking engagements based around her “Mercy in the City” book, and continues to perform works of mercy in New York City.

To reserve seating for this and other public events at Georgian Court University, e-mail specialevents@georgian.edu or call 732-987-2263. 

Kerry Weber will speak to the GCU community about her experiences incorporating the seven Corporal Acts of Mercy into daily life.

Author Kerry Weber will visit Georgian Court University this November to discuss her experience incorporating Mercy into her daily life while still holding onto her day job. Weber, now 32, decided to conduct an experiment when she was 29-years-old where she incorporated the seven Corporal Works of Mercy as part of her Lenten discipline.

The seven Corporal Works of Mercy are to feed the hungry, to give drink to the thirsty, to clothe the naked, to shelter the homeless, to care for the sick, to visit the imprisoned and to bury the dead. Her experiences are described in her book, Mercy in the City: How to Feed the Hungry, Give Drink to the Thirsty, Visit the Imprisoned, and Keep Your Day Job. She has also authored the book Keeping the Faith: Prayers for College Students.

During her public talk, November 18 at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater on GCU’s campus, Weber will share personal examples and stories of Mercy, and will connect her experiences to the tradition of the Sisters of Mercy and GCU. “I plan to discuss some of the main challenges that I’ve faced while trying to commit more fully to the Corporal Works of Mercy, as well as some of the surprising and hopeful things I’ve learned in the process,” Weber said. “So many of these works had an impact on me and the way I view mercy far beyond what I could have imagined.”

GCU Director of Campus Ministry, Jeff Schaffer, invited Weber to speak at GCU on behalf of the Year of Hope Committee. “I thought Kerry’s story would connect with our young adult students as well as the broader community,” Shaffer said.

Weber said she was honored to be invited by Schaffer and is always inspired by the energy and enthusiasm of students. She believes the two core components of mercy are community and building relationships, which is why she enjoys speaking and interacting with students and communities.

“I hope to both speak to my experience in trying to serve others, but also to learn from the joys and challenges that others have faced while trying to live more merciful lives,” she said. After conducting the experiment, Weber has learned to recognize Mercy in unexpected places, she explained. She added that it is more than just an action, but also a mindset. “I think many people already are doing a lot of these works without recognizing it. It’s important to lift up the sacredness of everyday actions,” Weber said.

“I hope our students, and all who attend, will be inspired to live mercy in their everyday lives,” Schaffer said. “Serving the poor and advocating for justice isn’t an intellectual pursuit. Mercy means serving living, breathing human beings and taking concrete action to help.”

Weber is the managing editor of America Magazine, a leading Catholic news magazine. She is currently involved with events and speaking engagements based around her “Mercy in the City” book, and continues to perform works of mercy in New York City.

To reserve seating for this and other public events at Georgian Court University, e-mail specialevents@georgian.edu or call 732-987-2263. 

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