An Era Ends . . . but the Journey Continues

After 14 years at the helm of Georgian Court University, President Rosemary E. Jeffries ’72, RSM, Ph.D., is stepping down in June 2015. She takes a walk down memory lane in the 2014 Fall/Winter Edition of GCU Magazine, but we still had more questions!

5 Questions with Sister Rosemary


GCU Magazine: Looking back, what advice would you give to the Sister Rosemary of 2001?

SRJ: Be clear about the priorities of your own life and make space for them. I have a commitment to a religious community and my own spiritual journey. The days, weeks, and months can get busy, and you may defer what’s important to you. Don’t. You have to……work at that commitment. You can’t just say I’ll get to that next year. Be attentive to what is important to you. (Editor’s Note: She spends at least an hour each morning praying, reading, and journaling.)

What are other major challenges to higher education as we know it?

SRJ: The Internet is changing the expectations of students coming to us. There is more competition for students because the higher education landscape is so different now, especially given changing interests in majors and academic programs. Another consideration is a student’s capacity to be a full-time student. Today, many more students are trying to complete their degrees while working part time or even full time.

Why are you so focused on the Mercy core values?

SRJ: This world needs men and women who have values that center them, who embrace values that drive a good education, a decent living, and a contribution to the public good. During the college years, students need to find each other and to find their own way, using their moral compass. The Mercy core values give them something to hang on to.

You’re known for your abundant energy. Why step down now?

SRJ: I wanted the opportunity to finish some things that needed to be done, although you never really finish. Plus, I’ve never had a sabbatical. I’m looking forward to that while I’m still in good health and young enough to enjoy it.

What do you want for the future of GCU?

SRJ: I would hope the commitment to Mercy mission and core values remains strong. Also, as we become more and more co-ed, I would expect to see the resident population increase and fully embrace the collegiate experience—from academics to leadership to athletics.

 

— As told to Gail H. Towns, GCU Director of Marketing & Communications

After 14 years at the helm of Georgian Court University, President Rosemary E. Jeffries ’72, RSM, Ph.D., is stepping down in June 2015. She takes a walk down memory lane in the 2014 Fall/Winter Edition of GCU Magazine, but we still had more questions!

5 Questions with Sister Rosemary


GCU Magazine: Looking back, what advice would you give to the Sister Rosemary of 2001?

SRJ: Be clear about the priorities of your own life and make space for them. I have a commitment to a religious community and my own spiritual journey. The days, weeks, and months can get busy, and you may defer what’s important to you. Don’t. You have to……work at that commitment. You can’t just say I’ll get to that next year. Be attentive to what is important to you. (Editor’s Note: She spends at least an hour each morning praying, reading, and journaling.)

What are other major challenges to higher education as we know it?

SRJ: The Internet is changing the expectations of students coming to us. There is more competition for students because the higher education landscape is so different now, especially given changing interests in majors and academic programs. Another consideration is a student’s capacity to be a full-time student. Today, many more students are trying to complete their degrees while working part time or even full time.

Why are you so focused on the Mercy core values?

SRJ: This world needs men and women who have values that center them, who embrace values that drive a good education, a decent living, and a contribution to the public good. During the college years, students need to find each other and to find their own way, using their moral compass. The Mercy core values give them something to hang on to.

You’re known for your abundant energy. Why step down now?

SRJ: I wanted the opportunity to finish some things that needed to be done, although you never really finish. Plus, I’ve never had a sabbatical. I’m looking forward to that while I’m still in good health and young enough to enjoy it.

What do you want for the future of GCU?

SRJ: I would hope the commitment to Mercy mission and core values remains strong. Also, as we become more and more co-ed, I would expect to see the resident population increase and fully embrace the collegiate experience—from academics to leadership to athletics.

 

— As told to Gail H. Towns, GCU Director of Marketing & Communications

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